Cookies

Like many good things, cookies were a mistake. Let us set the scene: the ‘30s, the Toll House Inn. Ruth Wakefield, the owner, has finished the powdered cocoa used to bake butter biscuits for her guests. A snap decision: she crushes a chocolate bar and adds it to the dough. Surely it will melt. But it did not. And so the most famous cookie in the States was born. Not exactly a light snack, but who are we to complain?

Puls’ recipes

Ingredients (serves approx. 20 cookies):

300 g flour
250 g butter
5 g bicarbonate
2 eggs
100 g brown sugar
100 g sugar
200 g chocolate chips
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 pinch of salt

Instructions:

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Cookies

cut the soft butter into cubes and start mixing with the sugar (1) and brown sugar (2) with a wooden spoon (3).

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Continue until you obtain a smooth cream (4). Make your life easier by resting the bowl on a damp cloth so it does not slip away while you mix. Gradually add two lightly whisked eggs (5) and mix well until you have poured in all the eggs (6).

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Add the vanilla extract (7). Once you have added all the ingredients and obtained a smooth mixture (8), sift the flour in another bowl, add the 5 g of bicarbonate and a pinch of table salt (depending on your own personal taste) (9).

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Add the chocolate chips (10) so that they spread evenly. With an ice cream scoop (or a simple spoon) scoop out some dough, then use your hands to create round spheres of 50 g each (11). Place on a drip or baking pan covered with baking parchment (12).

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Cookies

We decided to place eight, evenly spaced spheres (13) on a baking pan to ensure they do not merge during baking. The listed ingredients will yield approximately 20 cookies. Before baking, place the cookies in the fridge for approximately 1 hour to ensure they keep their shape when in the oven. Preheat the oven at 160 °C; place the tray in the middle of the oven and bake for around 35 to 40 minutes. They will be ready when crispy on the outside and soft on the inside (14). Place the cookies on a cooling grid (15). As soon as they are cool to the touch your cookies will be ready for eating! 


Keep your cookies in a tin box for up to 3 to 4 days. Cookies Policy

or accept them
Communication and public bodies

One museum, plenty of initiatives

The Museum Ladin promotes a raft of events, exhibitions, meetings and shows during the year. This cornucopia of events requires a clear, uniform message as well as a graphic support which does not weaken its message nor creates confusion. Every communication tool must be traceable back to its source and transmit continuity and be recognisable during the events.

Modular applications

Our job is to create and develop an overarching graphic communication concept, from posters, ads, and printed material that include returning elements as well as new ones. A modular, graphic concept the public body can manage on its own, even with different interlocutors and suppliers. We put our money where our mouth is.

Bodies, associations, institutions: public communication is another arrow in our quiver.

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